Sunday, February 2, 2014

The Church Of Aesop


When I was eight years old I was given a used children's book that was a wonderful collection of literature for young minds like mine. Being an avid reader for as long as I can remember, of course I almost "read the print off the pages" (as my dad used to kid me). 
 
My favorite portion was the illustrated collection of Aesop's favorites. I loved Aesop then and do still today, often referencing one of his tales when I want to make a point. I love stories that have a moral. And why not? I was reared on Jesus and his parables. Even today I still get a real kick out of certain of Jesus' stories.
 
But back to Aesop. Mind you, there is a bit of debate about the man - whether he really existed at all (although there are indeed brief references to him in ancient writings). Then also we don't have any of his original writings (assuming he did exist, of course). Students of Aesop's fables have not failed to notice that many of his tales exist in various versions all across the world, and so probably all could not have been original with him. And the fables themselves detail the most incredible accounts of things, talking animals, for instance.
 
Ah, but I still find great value in Aesop's little stories. They hold more than a bit of the sacred for me because I treasure wisdom. So details about who thought them up or when or if they have a true basis are totally beside the point for me.
 

Does this make me a mythic theologian? 

5 comments:

  1. I always love Aesop's fables too. I remember watching a cartoon show or something as a kid that had a segment each episode with one little Aesop story. It was my favorite part of the show.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think parents would do well to make sure their children are acquainted with Aesop's stories. They are great.

      Delete
  2. I don't think I ever read one. I'll check them out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be time well spent, I believe.

      Delete
  3. I am reminded what a believer friend of mine said about prayer. I don't think the idea was original with him because I heard one of my favorite writers say something similar:

    " prayer is not intended for God, (whoever/whatever that might be) but for the one praying"

    I believe along those same lines. It seems the line of thinking here is that we are a part of whatever it is that "God" is, distinct, but the same DNA, if you will. I am the first to say that human beings do not have the capability to understand or even comprehend that which makes up the Cosmos/God. That is simply beyond our capability to understand. That doesn't mean we don't try to understand. Certainly the quest is most probably the most important part of our journey in this life. I find the quest to be thrilling, chilling, and the most exciting thing in which I have had a part.

    ReplyDelete